DISCOVER AN ALTERNATIVE IBD TREATMENT

DISCOVER AN ALTERNATIVE IBD TREATMENT

Speak with your doctor to find a treatment plan that works for you. Our appointment checklist can help you get the conversation started.

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HOPE FOR THE FUTURE

Living with a chronic illness like Inflammatory Bowel Disease can be overwhelming at times. But managing your symptoms—and even sending them into remission—is possible with a treatment that is right for you. Talking to your doctor about your options is the first step towards finding a treatment strategy that will work for you long term.

IBD Video transcript Callout - EN

Iain: This place looks strange. These people seem different. But these are my people. Everyone here has their own story, their own struggle. While this is my story,

Iain: This is our Hell Bar. This here is my ileostomy. I got it after having surgery for my Crohn's Disease, not

Iain: something I chose to have, but Crohn's Disease didn't really give me a choice, and there it is.
When I was 11 years old, I started getting really sick. I was going to the bathroom anywhere from 10 to 20 times a day, extreme pain in my abdomen, loss of appetite, loss of energy. I was sleeping all the time.
Peter: One day he was reaching up into the cupboard, and his pants fell down to his ankles. Of course, his two sisters thought that was pretty funny and they had a few chuckles.

Peter: We knew that it wasn't that funny, because he looked like he was skin and bone.
Iain: That’s when we both recognized there's something seriously wrong. They weren't really sure what was going on, but it didn't go away. I was just consistently getting worse. Eventually I ended up going to see a gastroenterologist. They did a bunch of tests on me, and I got diagnosed with Crohn's Disease.
Debbie: Things we know now like cankers in his mouth and his knees, he was always saying his legs and knees hurt, we thought those were growing pains, but those were all signs of Crohn's.
Iain: The first time I was hospitalized, the catalyst for that was the severe inflammation that I was having in my abdomen. I wasn't able to eat anymore because it just hurt too much. As the food would pass through, it would hit those inflamed spots, and I'd just have severe pain.
Peter: His first operation, they took two or three feet of bowel out of him.

Debbie: I think it was more like a foot and a half.
Peter: Whatever. It was a lot.
Dr. Remo: Crohn's Disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the bowel. It leads to ulceration of the bowel, and symptoms of abdominal pain, diarrhea,

and unfortunately also systemic symptoms such as weight loss and fatigue. Hey Iain, come on in.
Iain: Hey.
Dr. Remo: How are you?
Iain: I'm good. How are you?
Dr. Remo: Good. Unfortunately, not all medications work for all patients. Historically, patients have required surgical resections, or part of their bowel to be resected. Iain's lived through that. He's had hope with some medications, which then he's lost response, required surgery, and multiple surgeries.

Dr. Remo: He was exposed to experimental therapies, some of which, again, he responded to for short periods of time, and unfortunately others that didn't make a difference. In the end, we just couldn't get control of him, and ultimately, he ended up with an ostomy, which is a bag to the outside of his skin to try to control his disease.
Iain: They had to basically cut my colon apart from my small intestine, bring my small intestine to the outside

Iain: of my body and my stools collected in a bag.
Debbie: Oh god, remember that day they told him the first time? He sobbed.
Peter: Yeah.
Debbie: He knew. He knew. But then he sucked it up like he always does, because he also knew he needed it.
Iain: It was a difficult transition for me, and

Iain: I was pretty resistant to it.
Debbie: It's a terrible thing, when people are starting to get really sexually active, and dating, and all those things, and he knew what that meant,

Debbie: it wasn't easy.
Dr. Remo The therapy that Iain is on right now is a new introduction of a biologic. He was introduced to this biologic in the clinical trial, which he had responded to very nicely. He’s on this biologic drug which is now commercially available, and really, it’s turned his life around.
Iain: It was just a matter of time ‘til I could find one that would work for me. You feel like your life has been stripped from you, and then one day you start taking

Iain: just an injection, and within a matter of months your life is back.
Dr. Remo: We've been able to reassess his disease on multiple levels beyond symptoms, and we've also been able to look back into Iain's bowel, and in areas where it's been damaged, it has completely healed. It's that depth of his remission that's allowed us to consider reversing his ostomy
Iain: This surgery is very different. This is me making the calls. Although I'm in remission, I have no active

Iain: disease right now, the repercussions of having part of one of your major organs separated from the rest is I'm constantly dehydrated. I'm tired a lot of the time. I can't eat enough to sustain myself. It's not a walk in the park still.
Iain: I'm finally at a place with my disease that I can do something positive
Iain: I've been having dreams for the last couple weeks about waking up from surgery and having another ileostomy. Not stoked
Emma: You've been thinking about it for a while, and it's been a big build up and stuff, so I just want it to go really well. You deserve it.

Emma: Are you supposed to walk again today?

Iain: Yeah.
Emma: Do you want to wait a little bit to see if it lightens up a little bit?
Iain: If it hasn't gotten any better since last night, I don't think it'll-
Emma: Get any better. Want to give it a try?
Iain: Yeah.
Emma: At least try and stand up.
Iain: Yeah. Emma: Okay.

Iain: Now that things have calmed down considerably, I know that I made the right call. It was a tough road getting to the point where I'm happy with the progress that I've made, and I know that things are just going to continually get better. With the 19 years of my life that I’ve had Crohn’s Disease, with a log of time and a lot of effort I’ve now found a drug that does work. I think people who are newly diagnosed have a pretty bright future. People who’ve been diagnosed for a really long time, I think your future is looking pretty bright too.

Iain: I may look strange, I may be different, but now that you've seen inside my life, inside my gut, you know that I'm not defined by my look, but by my character, by my struggles. I am who I am. I'm not just Crohn's Disease. I am

Iain: Iain. I'm just doing my thing.
On Screen Copy: There are many options in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. All treatments have benefits and risks, some of which can be serious, and can vary by individual. If you are living with Crohn’s disease, talk to your doctor about a treatment that might be right for you.
Production supported by a registered member of Innovative Medicines Canada

LIVING WITH IBD

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease) is a chronic condition that involves inflammation of the digestive tract. Both types of IBD come with varying degrees of the following symptoms:

  • Severe diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss

 

BIOLOGIC MEDICATIONS CAN HELP

The journey towards remission looks different for everyone, but biologic medications are one of the treatment options available. 

WHAT ARE BIOLOGICS?

HOW DO BIOLOGICS HELP IBD?

HOW ARE BIOLOGICS ADMINISTERED?

Derived from living cells, biologics are large complex molecular structures.

Biologics target a variety of different proteins in the immune system that are involved in inflammation. By blocking and/or neutralizing these proteins, the medications help reduce the signs and symptoms of the disease, help reduce inflammation and in some cases, may promote disease remission and intestinal healing.

Biologics are administered via injection, either intravenously or subcutaneously.

Derived from living cells, biologics are large complex molecular structures.

Biologics target a variety of different proteins in the immune system that are involved in inflammation. By blocking and/or neutralizing these proteins, the medications help reduce the signs and symptoms of the disease, help reduce inflammation and in some cases, may promote disease remission and intestinal healing.

Biologics are administered via injection, either intravenously or subcutaneously.

 

 

LOOKING FOR AN ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT? TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT BIOLOGICS.

It’s possible to make dealing with IBD symptoms a smaller part of your day to day life. Our IBD checklist can help you start the conversation about the treatment options available to you.

DOWNLOAD CHECKLIST

 

 

NOTE: Patients should be aware of the risks and benefits of switching their treatment from one biologic to another. The best course of action is to discuss with your doctor to determine what treatment is right for you.